Restored Hearts (Born for India Book 2)

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The youth believed what he was taught and was so desperate, so devoid of all hope, that violence seemed the only alternative. Gandhi felt only pity for the young man. He even told the outraged chief of police to not harass his assailant but make an effort to convert him to right thoughts and actions.

This was always his approach. No one abhorred violence more than Gandhi.

At the same time no one knew more deeply that violence can only be countered by nonviolence. Just as fire is extinguished by water, hatred can only be defeated by love and compassion. Some criticized Gandhi for coddling the terrorist. Others scorned his conviction, calling it sentimental and unrealistic, an empty vision. Many revered his name, but few truly shared his beliefs. For Gandhi, nonviolence meant an overflowing love for all humanity, a way of life that emanated from the very marrow of his being.

It made life possible; without it, he could not have lived even a moment. But for many of his followers, nonviolence was simply a political strategy, a tactic for winning India's independence from Britain. The more earnestly he pursued his religious beliefs, the deeper his love for humanity grew. This love made it all the more impossible for him to ignore the political realities that shaped people's lives.

At the same time, contact with these political realities strengthened his conviction that nothing is more essential than the love for humanity that religious faith can inspire. Because he walked the middle way, the true path of humanity that seeks to reconcile apparent contradictions, his beliefs and actions appeared biased to those at the extremes. The September 11 attacks against the United States were savage beyond words. Our fellow SGI members and friends were among the victims.

The attacks provoked universal revulsion and the heartfelt desire that such slaughter never be repeated. For what crime were these innocent people killed? There is no reason, nothing that could possibly justify such an act. Even if, as has been reported, the perpetrators believed they were acting based on their religious faith, their acts in no way merit the name of martyrdom.

Martyrdom means offering up one's own life, not taking the lives of others. True self-sacrifice is made to save others from suffering, to offer them happiness. Any act that involves killing others is reprehensible and purely destructive. The time has come for humankind to join together to put an end to terrorism. The question is, how can this be achieved? Will military retaliation serve that end? Isn't it likely only to incite more hatred? Even if, for argument's sake, the immediate "enemy" could be subdued, would that bring true peace? Long-simmering hatreds would only be driven further underground, making it impossible to predict where next in the world they might burst forth.

Our world would be tormented with ever greater fear and unease. Peace that is based on the forceful suppression of people's voices and concerns, whether it be in your own or other countries, is a dead peace--the peace of the grave.

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Surely that is not the peace for which humanity yearns. I am also reminded of a moving episode that Leo Tolstoy related in a letter written two months before his death. The letter, dated September 7, , was addressed to Mahatma Gandhi. The episode went something like this. There was a test on the subject of religion in a certain girls' school in Moscow.

A bishop had come to the school and was quizzing the girls one by one about the Ten Commandments.

‘AHS: Apocalypse’ – The Biggest Questions That Need to Be Answered in the Finale

When he came to the commandment "Thou shalt not kill," the bishop asked: "Does God forbid us to kill under all circumstances? The girls each answered as they had been taught. We may kill in war or as legal punishment. Then one of the girls, her face flushed with indignation, spoke up: "Killing is wrong under all circumstances!

The bishop was flustered and marshaled all his rhetorical skills to convince the girl that there were exceptions to the commandment against killing, but to no avail.


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It says so in the Old Testament. Moreover, Jesus not only forbade killing but taught that we must do no harm to our neighbors. In the face of truth in the girl's assertion, the bishop's authority and verbal skills were of no use whatsoever. In the end, he could only fall silent. The young girl, Tolstoy wrote with evident satisfaction, had proven victorious. Let us amplify the words of that young girl--"It is wrong to kill, even in war!

The twentieth century was a century of war, a century in which hundreds of millions of people died violent deaths. Have we learned anything from those horrific tragedies? In the new era of the twenty-first century, humanity must be guided by the overriding principle that killing is never acceptable or justified--under any circumstance.

Unless we realize this, unless we widely promote and deeply implant the understanding that violence can never be used to advocate one's beliefs, we will have learned nothing from the bitter lessons of the twentieth century. The real struggle of the twenty-first century will not be between civilizations, nor between religions. It will be between violence and nonviolence. It will be between barbarity and civilization in the truest sense of the word.


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More than half a century ago, Gandhi sought to break the cycles of violence and reprisal. What distinguishes us from brute beasts, he said, is our continuous striving for moral self-improvement. Humanity is at a crossroads and must choose, he asserted, violence the law of the jungle or nonviolence the law of humanity. The world today, in fact, has an extraordinary and unprecedented opportunity. We have the chance to open a new page in human history.

Now is the time to make the following declaration:. We regard terrorist attacks to be a challenge to the law of humanity. It is for just this reason that we refuse to follow the law of the jungle upon which the attacks were based. We declare our determination to find a solution not by military means but through extensive dialogue. Rather than further fuel the flames of hatred, we choose to douse them with a great "flood of dialogue" that will enrich and benefit all humanity.

This is the best, the only means to assure that such horrors are never repeated, and we believe it is the most fitting way to honor the memory of those who lost their lives in the attacks. Such a declaration, put into action, would certainly be met with the unstinting praise of future historians. Great good can come of great evil. But this will not happen on its own. Courage is always required to transform evil into good.

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'AHS: Apocalypse' - The Biggest Questions That Need to Be Answered in the Finale

Now is the time for each of us to bring forth such courage: the courage of nonviolence, the courage of dialogue, the courage to listen to what we would rather not hear, the courage to restrain the desire for vengeance and be guided by reason. In conversations with Mrs. And I spoke of my desire to bring the light of India, with its immense spiritual heritage, to the people of Japan. This wish was eventually realized in the form of an exhibition entitled "King Ashoka, Mahatma Gandhi, and Nehru--Healing Touch" that was held in Japan in After witnessing firsthand the cruel realities of war, he converted to Buddhism, deciding that he would base his rule not on military force but on the Dharma, the principles of Buddhism.

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